National Archives of Hungary

Over the last three years, the partners of the E-ARK Project have worked together to develop and test specifications and tools for the creation and management of information packages for preservation. Around this work they have also been busily undertaking complementary research and resource creation, resulting in a wide variety of new and improved practical solutions for those undertaking digital preservation activities.

On a crisp, cold day at the beginning of December 2016, we gathered at the beautiful main building of the National Archives of Hungary in Budapest (see right) to share the results of all that hard work at our final conference. I was there on behalf of the DPC and, even as a member of the project team, I was impressed by the scope and quality of the work shared during the event.

In this blog post, through the medium of the Tweets we sent out into the wild over the two days, I hope to share some of the highlights from presentations given at the conference. The tools, resources and solutions they mention will be of interest to many DPC members and friends. More information on all the E-ARK resources mentioned below can be found on the project website: http://www.eark-project.eu.


After a welcome to the event from Szuzanna Miko, Director of the conference hosts the National Archives of Hungary, Clive Billenness kicked off day one with an introduction to the project and it’s practical approach:

This was followed by an inspiring keynote from Alina Senn of the European Commission:

Janet Delve of the University of Brighton was quick to let slip the true aims of E-ARK:

But, then again, the impact of the project is already obvious:

We were then given overviews of the 7 pilots undertaken by the project, which examined 20 different practical, real-world scenarios:

Day one continued after lunch with a keynote from Angela Dappert of the British Library, sharing some interesting thoughts on standard development:

Ricardo Vieira, of the Technical University of Lisbon, introduced useful resources available via the E-ARK Knowledge Centre:

On day two David Anderson, University of Brighton, gave a whirlwind tour of the legal research undertaken as part of E-ARK:

Picking up from day one’s pilot overviews, István Alföldi of the National Archives of Hungary discussed the E-ARK General Model, another of the resources available in the Knowledge Centre:

A key component of E-ARK is the Common Specification for Information Packages, which Kuldar Aas, of the National Archives of Estonia, discussed:

One of the great strengths of the project, which was well demonstrated at the conference, was the variety of solutions developed:

This was a theme of the rest of the day as well as in the final key note from Krystyna Ohnesorge of the Swiss Federal Archives:

Find out more about all the tools and solutions developed during E-ARK on the project website. 

And finally, if you’re wondering about sustainability of the E-ARK products:

Slides from the presentations at the conference are available on the E-ARK Website and videos will be available in due course.

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