26 February 2019 | 10:30 - 15:00 Glasgow | Talk Lab, Main Library, University of Glasgow


Jisc Financial Planning Invitational Workshop

This invitational event will bring together the funded partners within the Jisc RDSS programme with invited guests to discuss the potential requirements for financial planning tools. Topics will include use cases for financial planning as well as the features a system such as RDSS should incorporate in order to support those uses cases and requirements.

Over the years a number of initiatives have attempted to support the sustainability of digital objects by modelling and asserting the cost of digital preservation. Recognizing the need to articulate the benefits that accrue from digital preservation, these same projects have documented the benefits that arise, whether now or in the future. Detailed economic analysis which suggests the importance of long-term access to research data for reproducibility and re-use, supplemented by the policy statements of funders, make the case for preservation compelling. Simultaneously, elevated claims have asserted the value of data both in material and long-term economic terms. The stock of companies that gather and manage data have soared and entire economies are being imagined, fuelled by data. And yet, time and again senior managers, whether in commercial environments or in public sector agencies, attempting to ‘do more for less’ have been relatively slow to take responsibility for digital preservation. Given a false dichotomy between real costs now or supposed benefits in the future, it is easy to understand why too few institutions have invested properly in digital preservation.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the accumulation of research collections added materially to the balance sheets of memory institutions around the world. Numerous expeditions and research projects were explicitly funded in anticipation of the collections that would accrue; and the Government has long accepted archives, artwork and entire historic properties in lieu of tax. As a consequence, the libraries, archives and museums of the country have become the custodians of this enduring, tangible and acknowledged value.  The digital turn has disrupted this equation in the value of research collections. Although it is common to refer to digital materials as ‘digital assets’, this metaphor is misleading. Unlike books, paper archives, or artwork it is difficult to calculate the value of digital assets in financial terms, so to accountants – and therefore risk and audit committees – ‘digital assets’ are ‘intangible assets’. In our generation, it is all too easy for senior management to view digital collections as a liability; investment in their long-term preservation as specious.

In order to address this tension, and to find more practical strategies for planning costs and articulating the value of digital research data collections, Jisc and DPC invite the Jisc RDSS pilot institutions to join us for a day of consultation. This workshop will focus on the needs of HEI institutions for calculating and describing costs and for access to value modelling tools for digital objects. A range of initiatives will be introduced, summarizing the state of the art. Participants will then be invited to propose and frame a programme of research and development, immediately pertinent to research data but of wider relevance.  This will include findings of recent projects and how these and related tools can help inform business cases for RDM/RDSS.

This invitational event will bring together the funded partners within the Jisc RDSS programme with invited guests to discuss the potential requirements for financial planning tools. Topics will include use cases for financial planning as well as the features a system such as RDSS should incorporate in order to support those uses cases and requirements.

In the morning, participants will hear relevant speakers provide case studies about financial planning for data management and digital preservation. Morning talks will also address the costs and benefits of data management and accounting for the value of data as an intangible asset. The workshop will help inform business cases for RDM/RDSS and digital preservation. In the afternoon, participants will engage in discussion and exercises to provide feedback on these case studies and project findings to develop suggestions for how RDSS can support financial planning.

This event will help to shape the upcoming Briefing Day on ‘Financial Planning, Digital Preservation and Research Data Management’, scheduled for Wednesday 29th May in Birmingham.

Programme

10:30 Tea, Coffee, & Registration

11:00 Welcome & Introduction to the day, William Kilbride and Paul Stokes

11:20 Introductory Keynote, Neil Beagrie

12:00 Case Study One: the value of digital archives, James Travers

12:20 Q&A 

12:30 Lunch

13:15 Case Study Two: the digital preservation business case at Glasgow University, Matt Mahon

13.30 Case Study Three: The Curation Costs Exchange, Sarah Middleton 

13.45 Facilitated Discussion & Debate

14:45 Actions & Next Steps

15:00 Thanks and Close

More Information

This workshop is part of a series of events in 2019, run by The Digital Preservation Coalition on behalf of the Jisc Open Research Hub (formerly known as the Research Data Shared Service, RDSS). Currently, this offers a pilot service to enable researchers to deposit data for publication, discovery, safe storage, long term archiving and preservation. As part of the pilot, Jisc have engaged the DPC to facilitate opportunities for community validation, wider dissemination, and horizon scanning with respect to the relationship between institutional research data management and digital preservation. These workshops will consult, present, and shape the digital preservation capabilities of the Open Research Hub.

This event is free of charge but is first come first serve. In the first instance we ask participants to send no more than 2 delegates to the workshop.


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