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Controlling the costs of long-term digital accessibility - A cost model for long-term digital accessibility

Herman Uffen, Tamar Kinkel and Shannon Roest

Herman Uffen, Tamar Kinkel and Shannon Roest

Last updated on 15 July 2019

Herman Uffen, Tamar Kinkel and Shannon Roest work for BMC on behalf of the Dutch Digital Heritage Network


The difficulties of managing and controlling the costs of digital sustainability

Controlling and managing the costs of digital sustainability remains a recurring topic in the field. Back in 2015 the 4C-project stated the following view: “In five years time it will be easier to design or procure more cost effective and efficient digital curation services because the costs, benefits and the business cases for doing so will be more widely understood across the curation life cycle and by all relevant stakeholders. Cost modelling will be part of the planning and management activities of all digital repositories.”

This view has not been realized yet. The costs of digital sustainability are often still unclear and difficult to manage: This because they are usually difficult to determine and are often not recorded as such in the regular financial exploitation of institutions. Furthermore, these structural costs are often funded in a project-based manner (focus on the short term).

In response to these findings the Dutch Heritage Network developed and implemented a cost model in the fields of: cultural heritage, media, archives and science in the Netherlands. This with the intent of creating transparency in the costs of digital sustainability and to create a tool which enables controlling and managing these costs in the future. 

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Plans for Future Particle Colliders and Their Impact on Data Preservation

Jamie Shiers

Jamie Shiers

Last updated on 12 July 2019

Jamie Shiers works in the Information Technology Department at CERN and is Manager of the Data Preservation for Long-Term Analysis in High Energy Physics (DPHEP) Collaboration


Every 5 – 7 years, physicists from around the world get together to discuss their views on the priorities for Particle Physics – both in Europe and in collaboration with corresponding plans for other parts of the world[1]. At the most recent of these symposia, held in Granada in May 2019, with the intent of forming a strategy that can be approved by the CERN Council in May 2020, there was notable enthusiasm for a new electron-positron collider (this might be linear, circular, built in Europe or elsewhere). Should such a machine be hosted at CERN – for example, in a 100m circular tunnel corresponding to one of the proposals – it would be unlikely to enter operation before the mid to late 2030s.

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‘Access is What we are Preserving’: But for Whom?

David Underdown and Leontien Talboom work at The National Archives UK


Designated Communities, Representation Information and Knowledge Bases in a Wiki World 

Thanks to Andy Jackson of the British Library's web archiving team for partial inspiration for the title of this post (the rest of the conversation is also largely relevant to the post too)

Introduction

Most of us in the digital preservation field are familiar with the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) model. After nearly two decades this model has become a backbone for many of our architectures, certification and protocols. Terms such as AIP, SIP and DIP are in common use and the first sighting of the OAIS diagram at a conference is frequently remarked on. The model has given us a common language to communicate our digital preservation needs with. But how many of us have actually read and engaged with the model further than the most common terms from it? We would like to admit that the first time we read the guidelines of the OAIS model was at the start of this year, even though we have been using terms from the model throughout both our digital archiving careers.

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Developing a digital preservation service for the British Museum - Part 1

Glenn Cumiskey

Glenn Cumiskey

Last updated on 4 July 2019

Glenn Cumiskey is Digital Preservation Resource Manager at the British Museum


The British Museum faces many challenges in its plans to better manage its data. For example, the capacity of the British Museum storage area network (SAN) has for some years been unable to meet the growing demands placed on it by the voluminous growth of data created by Museum staff in pursuit of their day-to-day activities.

Data growth is driven by many factors. As technologies reduce in cost but increase in the size and complexity of the assets they generate, the number of assets created and the storage footprint of these will naturally and potentially exponentially increase.

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Not Your Childhood Fire Drills

Bradley Daigle

Bradley Daigle

Last updated on 27 June 2019

Bradley Daigle is the Content Lead for the Academic Preservation Trust and Chair of the Coordinating Committee for the NDSA's Leadership Group


While at the most recent PASIG, held in Mexico City, I sat in the audience and responded to a question that I interpreted to be about preservation stewardship responsibility and where it resides. Apparently, the solution I put forward was not something that others had considered or were planning. Therefore, in this post, I am providing some context and explanation of what we are doing at Academic Preservation Trust (APTrust) to provide a more rounded approach to preservation responsibility. This overview will be a description of what I call “fire drills” or what our tech team refers to as “test restores”.

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A new maturity model for digital preservation

Jenny Mitcham

Jenny Mitcham

Last updated on 20 June 2019

We’d like to tell you a little bit about a digital preservation maturity model we have been developing for DPC members.

“What? Another maturity model?” you might say.

Indeed there are many maturity models already available, so why create another?

To answer that, I’ll give you a bit of background as to how this particular piece of work came about and how we have approached it.

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Digital preservation in a nuclear context - the first six months

Jenny Mitcham

Jenny Mitcham

Last updated on 14 June 2019

Last month I celebrated my 6 month work anniversary at the DPC. Happily, this coincided with our first DPC York team night out. Did it really take 6 months to get the 3 of us out for a drink after work? Apparently yes!

My first 6 months at the DPC really has flown by. I haven’t been blogging as much as I expected, but that is largely down to the fact I’ve been keeping my head down, travelling lots and working hard on the project I was recruited for - a collaboration with the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA).

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Undateables – methods for determining date ranges for born-digital documents when file system dates go bad

Paul Young

Paul Young

Last updated on 12 June 2019

Paul Young is Digital Preservation Specialist/Researcher at the National Archives UK


What’s the problem?

Determining reliable dates for digital records can be a source of frustration, especially when confronted with a large volume of digital files with dates that are obviously incorrect, such as why your Microsoft Word Document 1997 version dates from 1st January 1970.

Dates are very important for The National Archives in particular as we look to transfer records from departments under the 20-year rule of the Public Record Act. When these dates are unknown or obviously incorrect, we cannot be sure if a department is in compliance with the Act.

The National Archives uses the ‘date last modified’ generated by the file system, and extracted via DROID, as the standard ‘go to’ date to populate the official ‘date’ entry in our catalogue. After seeing several collections and scenarios where the ‘date last modified’ did not provide an accurate date for the file we have been doing a bit of investigation of other methods for extracting accurate dates for born-digital records.

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UoL Digital Ecosystem: a collaborative approach to preservation and access

Russell Kennedy and Ed Pinsent

Russell Kennedy and Ed Pinsent

Last updated on 24 May 2019

Russell Kennedy is Web and Digital Solutions Analyst and Ed Pinsent is Digital Archivist at the University of London


Introduction

You join us at an exciting time. The University of London (UoL) is embarking on an ambitious, collaborative programme of work, which aims to create a culture of digital best practice throughout the institution. Central to this initiative is the long-term digital preservation of content, and our aim is to weave the importance of preservation into the fabric of the University, building it into job descriptions and training provision.

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Stand By Me

Sharon McMeekin

Sharon McMeekin

Last updated on 17 May 2019

Keep Going Pin BadgeI’ve got a lot of mileage on this blog from writing about our Inclusion and Diversity policy, from the point we decided to create one, to its publication, but this time I’m going to talk about one of the more personal reasons why it was important to me. This week in the UK is Mental Health Awareness Week and I didn’t want it to pass without recognising why it is important and why we need to talk more openly about mental health. Discussion of mental health is still too often taboo and those who suffer from issues stigmatised.  So, when I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression just over two years ago, I decided that I would never shy away from sharing my own experience.

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